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don't remember his name. the fact the could not remember what departments or in the government is a little forgivable. i did it for the same reason, in many respects. i wanted to deal with something i like, that i thought was worth pursuing. a long time ago i did a book called "the emerging republican majority.: it pretty much did emerge. i thought i would take the methodology that i used in the book to try to, with a good explanation, a realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, would you deal with one comment that i saw on the web written by weisburg a number of years ago. he called you a liberal. >> i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party for a long time there was a major progressive movements. but, liberal, i don't think so. outsider, antiestablishment, but not liberal and not merely conservative either. i would not accept either of those labels. i understand it does not stop with those labels. in terms of the politic
us your own views on liberal conservatives now. i was always a bit more of a populist. i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party. outsider, and antiestablishmentarian. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a very intelligent man, a man with enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. and i understand much better, which i did not a time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he couldn't keep all those worms in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or especially watergate. >> how did you keep up with him after the years that he was president? >> he read one of my books from the early 1980's that he liked. somehow, we started having correspondence again. i would see him max four times a year. his office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our ho
not going to read this because i don't know where those places are. and generally did not have to go to a map much. i did research the way i have always done it, pretty much of myself. bring it all myself and having it there. basically thinking it out or not thinking out, off by myself. >> which character in the 1775 book, both british and american, was the most interesting to you? >> actually, a lot more interesting. if you think interesting in were thesignificant important impression, george washington was probably people think of him as, enormously impressive in a lot of ways. he was very careful in what he did to crate that image. -- to create that image. he made a number of mistakes. the rest of the time, he was very good. sam adams, i have enormous respect for him. he burned a lot of records that might have told us more about him. but i think he seemed a lot of things brilliantly. i think, for example, he knew what happened at lexington and concord before anyone. sam adams schemed all kinds of things out brilliantly. it would take me a documentary and a series of four books to
. it was a -- a -- little, i don't know, just an interesting experience. >> your first -- first biggest storm like that, you got other storms was this bigger than -- >> i think this was the biggest one that i was in. even though i'm from western iowa, where we would get these tornado warnings all the time and have to go to the basement, but we never got hit by a tornado. so i think this was the biggest one that i was in. >> and then, when did you go to new york and what did you see when you went into manhattan? >> i drove to new york excitedly as a 25-year-old graduate from professor van allen's physics department at the university of iowa in 1967, where i met steve schneider who was a student at that time. and, if i could just say a couple words about steve, it's kind of -- it's ironic that i'm getting the steve schneider award because we could not have been more opposite. [laughter] he had the gift of gab, you know, he's so articulate as a student and as a postdoc. so when i -- then i went off to the netherlands where i met my wife, who -- then i came -- who eventually became my wife, but i -- when i came
trillion debt and everybody keeps spending. don't we have to pay this debt down? host: the debt is $16.3 tr illion. another looming deadline. the treasury department can extend the deadline for the next month or two. part of the dynamics in the negotiations. front page of "the washington times." is the brink" cutline. host: harry reid had this to say on the senate floor. [video clip] >> the american people do not understand. the house is operating without the house of representatives. it is being operated with a dictatorship by the speaker. if the $250,000 would be brought would pass. speed brainer could've brought legislation to the house and it would have passed. host: gcomments by harry reid. the senate is in session today. bill has this point -- from "the national journal" -- the story is available online. "the president will have a strong hand to play over what to do about the tax hikes and spending cuts about to hit the economy. to allow the bush-era tax cuts to lapse for the wealthiest of americans. good morning, clyde. caller: good morning. political capital. neither harry reid nor
's debate and help get more young people engaged in the political realm. i have always said if you don't do politics, you have it done to you. -- [inaudible] you choose ton address the important issues. transport, employment, marriage equality, and education. these are the issues that this has debates regularly. and i'm sure your insights will inform our debates too. the current financial crisis has hit young people hard. 150,000, 16 to 24-year-old have been unemployed for more than six months. it's more important now than ever to stand up and make your voices heard. today is part of that. all three major political parties have shown an interesting in lowing the voting age to 16. hope you can be ambassador to show your generation are engaged, passionate and key to getting involved in the political process. [inaudible] the parliament why you understand that politics is not a spectator sport. you have shown that your willing to take responsibility for articulating the vision of young people today. and you have shown you care about what is going on in our society. and you want to change it to
>> did the pentagon have review? >> no, didn't have fop once i'm retired from active due any i don't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where are those 3,0
the hoopla that went with that, which is not what i do, i'm not a communicator and i don't enjoy it. so, when there were request for interviews, steve said he was happy to take them. so -- >> and that division of labor was fine with you? >> yeah, that was fine with me. and if they insisted on someone on the east coast, then i send them to michael oppenheimer, but -- >> he's at princeton. so -- >> yeah. >> so on sandy, when you went back to new york after sandy, what did you see and what were you thinking? you wrote a book, storms of my grandchildren. were you thinking, aha, the storms i've been writing about are here now? >> well, it was an example. the storm -- you know, i titled it storms of my grandchildren because, if we pass the point where greenland begins to shed ice fast enough to cool the north atlantic, which only requires that you get up to about half a meter or so from greenland, that will increase the temperature gradients between the high latitudes and low latitudes and that is what drives cyclonic storms. so some of these storms of the century that we've had, the really big cyc
a number of years in the building. if sam raburn is not a reflection of that, i don't know who is. >> how about presidents under which you have served? >> ronald reagan. i had the honor of serving with him and he signed air quality district act for southern california. the first preschool program in the country was signed by ronald reagan. people hardly believed that but he was willing to use government in a way that was responsive to real challenged that government should be dealing with. i was proud that we had a chance to work together in connection with some of that. >> if you look across, it's a lot of history, 34 years altogether, is there a time when you look back and say those are the best years. those are the ones i enjoyed the most. >> every year that goes by it amazes me that i am still here. i did not plan to be here this long. if i did not have the chance to serve in some of those appropriations we would not have stayed this long. between now and then, there is little chance -- there are many ways to impact the process and the future of congress itself. it is my intention to
reasons why some members are aware of you. >> i have fought long and hard about this. i'm a liberal. i don't make laws for the second of it. and certainly when it comes to the press, the absolute worse outcome in all of this would be for nothing to happen at all. so mr. speaker we must not provide it. nothing i have seen so far in this debate suggests to me we will find a better solution. so with the prime minister shying away from one of lord justin levisohn's recommendations. he joins me in the studio. ross. david said he would expect levishon unless his conclusions are bonkers. >> why isn't he accepting it? >> it would cause drawing up laws to govern what the pressure should do. this really was a question of the heart of all of this. how could you make sure that everybody was involved including publishers that aren't to do so without the piece of legislation that would amount to system licensing. the law had to change. talks use similar language that would simply recognize an independent regulator in raw. this debate went for months and months and months. they were joined. it would be
calling into the show lately, they all keep trying to fault one person for the people since. i don't believe in abortion but i am pro-choice because it is not my choice to condemn anybody for doing a sin to themselves. god will judge them. i should never put my beliefs on somebody else and then judge of them. host: you said that religion is affecting your political decisions less lately and you said what their reelection of president obama. can you explain that a little bit more? caller: say it again? host: you said earlier religion is impacting your political decisions less this time around. why is that? caller: not less -- i said now that what is happening is people are judging our presidents on the laws and things he may or may not agree with -- he may not, i do not know which way. politicians should never make laws for his own religious beliefs. host: florence, ky. democratic caller. caller: the other day they had represented the brown on and a tape of him as saying the world is only 9000 years old going off the literal translation. people like that generally lack the ability t
in the early 1980's. if things don't get better very slowly does that start to put a strain on democracy? is that why we've seen a rice in some of these extremist parties in europe? >> you have to be careful associating them directly with recession. the french national front was as strong and appeared in austerity when jacques chirac the leader of the nacional he was second in the french election. so the socialists were out even though it was relative prosperity. they have gone backwards rather than forwards. what you have seen and i think this is exceptional is that the green there's the rice of the golden don, the neo fascist party. it's not mass political success. so i think you can say it's minor protest rather than a serious movement towards right- wing of what we saw in the 1930's. >> professor, thank you very much to dom see us. well, let's stay with europe because it was a subject that the government suffered an embarrassing defeat in the house of commons. the rouse was over the budget. it was due to be discussed in november and david cameron said he wanted it frozen. but many of
and they don't put it in perspective. how much are we talking about in terms of revenue. as a share of the revenue we're going to raise over the next ten years. how much are we talking about saving in these accounts in relationship to how much we're going to spend? i think this is lack. -- is lacking. i think if it was added it would change people's views about how difficult or how not so difficult these changes might be. other mandatory spending. the president talks about savings there on a base of $5.1 trillion. that's a savings of 4% in other mandatory accounts. things like ago gri culture -- things like agriculture where we have passed in the senate a farm bill that saves $23 billion. that is certainly something we could do. let's go to the next if we could. so already an act of savings from the budget criminal act and i hear all the time the senate hasn't passed a budget resolution for three years. instead of a budget resolution we passed a law called the budget control act. and that budget control act in many ways was much stronger than any resolution because as all of you kno
account. given money away like in new york and new jersey. $60 billion or $80 billion. don't they have insurance of the up there? host: thank you for the call. is this from bill king. this is bob, good morning. caller: happy new year. host: to you, too. caller: all the republican party has to do is to allow for what the voters voted on by putting obama back in office, which was the mandate that people earning above $250,000 pay 4.5%.eer lousy that is not a hair off their chinny-chin-chin. everybody is looking to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- i
that he had a year ago, that does not count. for republicans and people to say they don't understand what's going on, i have a problem with that. the republicans deny anything he puts forward. the president left his vacation and came here. they're not being fair. republicans say they are christians. they're not. they did this during his last term and now are causing and all of us to suffer because they don't like the president. this is personal. this has nothing to do with raising taxes. this is a personal attack and i think it's a shame. we look like a third world country. we don't look like the united states. host: let's get a republican voice. our next caller is calling from west bloomfield, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: i would like to get your thoughts on a balanced approach and have unbiased taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approac
california is recognized. mr. berman: i don't see the one individual who had asked to join in speaking on this so i will yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. ms. ros-lehtinen: we yield back the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 3331? those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the gentlelady from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceed option this motion will be postponedful for what purpose does the gentleman from -- the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? ms. ros-lehtinen: i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3159 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3159 a bill to direct the president in partnership with the department of development, the
. patricia rights in -- i want to go to don on the republican line from california. good morning. caller: canyon me? merry christmas, happy here -- happy new year. that last call shows you that the policy to win by dividing the country and making it us against them, the 47%, they are angry, they want your money, it is amazing. indeed to pass an exemption, all government trouble is not to be paid for with the tax exemption. amend the code says that anybody traveling for government purposes pays for themselves. that is obama and the $40 million worth of vacations. it is amazing. you heard the caller from georgia a comic that they are angry and they will write. you can see the country is being run by an amateur who does not know how to negotiate, he cannot write something on paper. anybody in college in 101 knows that you need to negotiate in a fair minded way. he is out to ruin the country. listen to his agenda. host: do you think compromise can be reached in the next 48 hours? caller: the answer is no. they want the retina. they are getting the money from the people -- they want the reven
crisis, i don't mean there is no debt. the debt is a huge problem just like a cancer patient has a problem with pain. but it isn't healthy to be -- but it is analytically unhelpful to be thinking in terms of the debt crisis. we might as well refer to the crisis we are going through as the savings crisis, a crisis caused by too much savings. you have never heard anyone from bloomberg refer to it as a crisis of a glut of money with nowhere to go, but it is, just as much as it is a crisis of debt. let's begin at the beginning. let's talk about debt. reading the mainstream outlets, newspapers, or listening to the idiotic stations like fox, hyou would think that it is possible to have capitalism without debt. recall of feudalism. -- well, it isn't. once, it was possible to have an economy with debt that is marginal. recall feudalism. what was the process that led to the accumulation of wealth? it began with production. peasants work on the land. they produce wheat, corn, so production came first. then came distribution. that would come in and take a large part of that mountain of corn
, he tells everyone about it. in almost every other program, they don't want to leave that information. if you bring in some kids for the summer, they will invariably tell their classmates when they go back to school things they are not supposed to. we always thought that was too risky and we were never able to do part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answ
's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and we have someone in the audience who knows a lot more about it but i think he made a judgment call which was and i think this is the same with the agencies whoever is working on it and who is being represented, are we going to get more good, he was never going to be able to control how he was portrayed in it and i'm sure if the f.b.i. and c.i.a. and military could control it, i'm sure they would. but it's a give and take. the difficult thing from an autistic point of view, how much -- from an artistic point of view, how much are you being compromised in the story you want to tell. what was interesting for us at one point that david famously had gone to the premiere of a film that he was a producer of the night before he did his interview with nixon and he was criticized about it. on the premiere of frost nixon he was interviewing blair the next day. he interviewed blair and managed to get out of that on the admission that the iraq war was
we don't live up to here, by the way. they will like that, too. i heard the russian judges speak about it thereafter. simple things. i did not know how you'd get them out of this -- as long as you have three people, the police chief, the prosecutor, and the judge deciding cases -- you could create a situation where the general public thinks that is abnormal. this is sort of weird. how do you bring that about? that is why you have to chapters in your book. the thing i like best about our bar is a lawyer will come in and say to a judge, judge, you are wrong. you are just wrong. they will say it politely. you are wrong. the judge will feel a little sheepish. if he will decide something so obviously wrong. and the press. i know the greatest test of the independent bar and prospered the press is always criticizing you and the bar is always telling you you are wrong. they are absolutely necessary. the judge and the other country saidwe should do something about the press and the bar. i said, no, that is not the point. [laughter] the point is opposite. you cannot do without this press w
spoke to reporters for about half an hour. >> why don't you give them a bunch over here and let them pass it out. ok, sorry for the delay. we thought we had a vote, but there was no vote. senator mccain and i are part of a group of eight senators who have been working for about a month to come up with a proposal for our leaders and our conferences, which will hopefully overcome the gridlock that has so permeated the u.s. senate. the eight senators who have participated in this effort are myself, senator mccain, senator schumer, senator alexander, senator cardin, senator kyl, senator prior, and senator barasso. it is a bipartisan proposal, and we believe strongly we must reform the senate's procedures if it is going to do business more efficiently and fairly. there are many parts to our proposal, i would say the key number-one part is to give the majority leader options to overcome the filibuster and the threat of a filibuster on a motion to proceed. that has been the greatest problem around here in terms of working on bills. we cannot get to bills if there is a filibuster or a threat
to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my understanding that the amount of money that you pay in through the payroll tax affects the amount of social security that you receive and it looks to me like people are under the illusion that this 2% is a good deal but at the same time, why they're going to be shortening themselves when they retire. is that right? guest: so that's a good question. it actually isn't really right. so the payroll tax is basically being used as a vehicle to deliver the tax cuts to workers. the way the federal budget accounting works is that the money that is not going into the social security system via the reduced payroll tax, is being reimbursed from general revenue so the reduced -- the reduced payroll tax from the last few years will not affect benefits that you accrue for the future. host: mark of the american enterprise institute writes under the headline "make the middle class pay more." he says -- host: your thoughts about what
don't do something about spending. even with tax increases, the kind i described in the previous question, would not be enough. ineffective regulation. effective regulation can be quite beneficial. in the automobile sector, the mileage requirement, but permits everybody to strive to a higher mark, up chiselling on the mileage stickers on cars. it improves our energy efficiency. that's a good thing. that is spurring growth. but the kind of reforms we have on wall street have not solved the problem. look at what happened last week's at usb, not only wild and irresponsible behavior, but then we have attorney general holder determining that he general holderubs the fullest -- attorney general holders a betty cannot prosecute ubs because he is afraid ubs is too big to shut down and would destroy financial markets. i thought dodd-frank was supposed to fix that. what was so disconcerting was the democrats did not join senator grassley in their u.n outcry about that protect the integrity of financial markets. it is something that should be bipartisan. but it is not, apparently. that is a
90% the new mentality in washington is that we don't to do it december 31. they have a couple of weeks in january before this starts to pinch a bit. it is not as much of a cliff that people were saying a few days ago? host: are we going over the cliff? guest: i think we're likely to do it. you don't have major economic effects on your afternoon's person income pay, paycheck. it is going to take a couple of weeks before that to start happening. you do have a brief week or two window where if they got something done it would be a political switch but not a major economic one. host: you're a veteran of the hill. when was the last time that congress was here between christmas and new year's? guest: i don't remember but it happens a lot on budget-related matters. when i worked on the hill there were lame-duck sessions but they did not go up this late. this is kind of chaos it is close to unprecedented. i've never seen a speaker be pushed back on by his own party as hard as what happened to john boehner this week. host: let me read to you "activists that helped john boehner's plan b
of israel and the people of lebanon. we've got to be very careful here that we don't create a situation that is the opposite of what we are trying to achieve. and if this resolution passes, and unfortunately i am not going to be able to support it, if it passes we have to do something to strengthen the lebanese army because if the lebanese army is not strong enough then you have a situation where the very thing we are opposing here could come to pass and with great force. so i would just urge your consideration of that and i thank you very much for giving me an opportunity to put this forward. and i thank, again, my colleagues for their constant support of israel. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentlewoman from florida is recognized. ms. ros-lehtinen: i am going to continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida continues to reserve. the gentleman from new york. mr. engel: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from florida, mr. deutch. the speaker pro tempore: th
you for being here this evening and thank you for being here on a friday night. i don't do this for a live sog you're going to have to fill in in the middle. let's start off shes we all know the wonderful shows and movies you've been involved with, many of which have overlapped with politics from "homeland," "the queen", so the first thing i'd like to ask -- i'd like to talk about the shows "homeland" and "the queen." where did those come from in the first place? >> "24" came from a basic idea, two writers. joel said it was an in the shower idea. i'm thinking about television and in television there are 22 or 24 episodes in a season, thinking about the number 24 and said could you do an entire series of television over the course of one day. and i was an executive at fox at the time and when he came in and said this to me and that was an intriguing notion could you do an entire series of television over one day real time. then he laid out the bearest pones of a story that would support that. it's a guy day of the california primary first unafrican-american way shot at the w
on. it is what we started, it is what larry did in the garages. we don't expect the government will be there, but that is certainly the direction that all of the firms we are representing here have lessons that can be learned. i think the principal areas, i get asked many times by representatives in government on how we can innovate like google. what can we learn from what they are doing? either the data centers, the overall philosophy, i think that one is relentless focus on the user. the technology is not serving just the staff. it is about changing the way that the users work, be it citizenry or employees. we had this idea for engineers to be successful, they need to be uncomfortably excited about what they are doing. and i do think there needs to be that in government as well. we talk about the challenge to break this model and get out of the path of what is acceptable to be done. take on more risk and recognize that the mission of the government is so important. >> consolidation is an area where the government, while getting out aggressively and quite publicly has clearly
climate change than the average person who says we have to take action right away because they don't think it is a real problem. they have all of these reasons not to back it up. as a scientist, i think the facts are enough. there is an enormous amount of fear that we're dealing with an issue where the m? are distant and far away. but the solutions -- where the impacts our descent and far away. but the solutions infringe on our freedom and our economy and our rights. there is a lot of emotion attached to this. do i think about which research projects to do? no, because i get it for standing up and saying that by seeing the change in humans are the cause. it is not new research here is the basic fact we have known for decades. >> how do you communicate that? >> they are are a few people for whom facts are important, but it is about fear. it is thinking that i am a conservative and conservatives don't think this is true. or i am a person of faith and this is not compatible with my faith in god. these a things that people near and dear to their hearts and not their brains. but we all live on
, but the problem of front is that we don't know, people are actually earning. in a model, there will have to be lots of adjustments made. i think making it loan-based and having them based on income and a set of rules that would keep people from gaming the system is a much better model than trying to plug the hole. and it also addresses the up front issues of students that are, for the first time, able to assess if they are prepared to do college level work. if we base their repayment on their income, if that experience doesn't influence their income, they are off the hook. i am not an economist, so i am not -- and in terms of ideas that i see as game changers, that is one that has been flooded and it has worked extremely well and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients t
trying to kill all the bush tax cuts. even mr. obama since 2005 when he was running as a senator. i don't know what your thoughts are about that. i would like to hear about the democrats voted to push us off the fiscal cliff. host: how you pick political heroes? caller: this is a republic and want to see going back to what it was. people are getting knocked off of unemployment in states because their rates went down. we go off this cliff, anybody on extended unemployment will not get a check in january. host: this is gary who chooses ben bernanke. beverly is next from vermont. caller: hello/ ? my choice is the teachers of america. i cannot believe that people did not speak up more for the teachers. they do they hurled job practically every day. host: why are they political heroes? caller: who do you think is going to run the country in the future? this is something that people do not understand. our future is our children. nobody seems to care. my choice is the teachers in america. the teachers that were killed the other day, they are true heroes. i cannot believe some of the idiots tha
an individual carbon source, although that's meritorious, it won't work if we don't have a price on carbon. >> yeah. and china will just -- all right. we're gonna invite your participation and, particularly, if you haven't had a chance to ask a question. and i'm gonna be assertive about -- i'm encouraging you to be brief and get to your question so we can get as many people to participate as possible. the line starts with our producer jane ann right there, and then i welcome your comments for dr. hansen. let's invite the audience participation. yes, welcome to climate one. >> thank you. congratulations. you deserve this award and thank you to all the scientists who are here who are providing we, policy makers and activists, with the information we need. i'm holly kaufman. my question is, in addition to the price on carbon, for some shorter term measures, what is your opinion on dealing with some of the shorter term but higher global warming potential gases like methane, which might not be as politically controversial to deal with? >> yes. i think methane and black carbon and some of the tr
of communication remain open. i don't know how much talking they did as the president was in hawaii spending time with his family and the speaker was back home in ohio, i believe. i don't know that for sure. everyone was doing their family time and not really working that significantly on something. i think there was probably some minimal conversation, but not a lot. as for the senate minority leader mitch mcconnell, i think that is a good one. a lot has been made in the past few days about him taking a higher profile role in these negotiations. while i don't like prognosticating into the future, we can look at the past in some of the previous negotiations of congress and the kind of role he has played. almost all of these talks, whether it was about government shutdown in the spring of 2011 or the debt limit debate in the summer of 2011 or the payroll tax-cut debate last year, those negotiations started at a level between the president and speaker but always broke down at that level and that pushed to the senate where harry reid and mitch mcconnell had to figure something out and get enough vote
. hello? 29 people just died. >> your advice was that you don't need to go there? >> i felt that i cannot save their lives but i can talk to the spouses and our field staff and find out what happened and where our resources were. >> why in the world would they tell you not to go? >> for whatever reason. i went against the advice and i went. it was the best thing i could have done because it also lifted up the spirit of my employees and give more credence to our organization. it said we are not afraid and we're not just a bureaucratic agency. we have sensitivity. we have people who work for us who are supposed to be there helping protect these people. it really broke through new ground for us. >> let's take another question -- it is great to have these kind of specifics. go ahead and identify yourself -- >> i am an international baccalaureate. thank you for your comments and you have a lot of wisdom and forgiving as a glimpse into the human side of things. with as many women who have reached panicles of their career and for those like yourself, is there a new path beyond that? once you rea
through the streets. everyone saying don't do it, mr. prime minister. bombs fall being. he would go there and get out of the car, talk to people in the street, the survivors, civilians. he was out there among them almost every day and most evenings. and they knew that. he would go to portsmouth around do the same thing. that was his genius. it was rash behavior, he had it do it. host: you said at one point that the lights were supposed to be off but he would smoke his cigar anyway. guest: he either was one occasion there were four of them in the car, coalville, a general, something else and the auto hraoeug auto lights were painted only the upper half and you were not supposed to use them at all if you didn't have to. and he came to a roadblock and the soldier said you there. host: tommy is what they called a british soldier? guest: yes. you in the car you can go no further. and from the car came go to hell, man. i'm thinking well, coleville was too general, the general was too polite. i think the fourth person feels -- was mr. bevan, the minister of labor, he was from the west cou
can give you that level of this event moved a number that many domestic -- that many decibels. i don't believe that is possible. it misses the point of the polls that finding out how over phrase is moving over the course of the election is important, but what they want to do is say why things are moving and understand the factors driving voters in one direction or another. why is it obama can be doing this well despite the poor economy? has romney been able to gain any traction? when you only focus on that tiny margin and get focused on double checking every hour, every day, you are missing the point of the polls. what i feel it is unfortunate is there is always a tendency to want to know the same thing but it has moved even more in that direction at the expense of looking at all of the interesting things polls can tell us. >> the election was really about fairness. republicans are not really learning that lesson into a certain extent. particularly on the and fairness issue. it is probably aggravating the problem. not just the 2% on taxation but the spending policies are out of whack
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
professors to say you are absolutely insane, don't you know anything about economics? actually, i do know a lot about economics. remember, though would -- the woodrow wilson school degree and a 20 years of reading between? the problem is, at least based on the last 10 years, it is the finance departments in the business schools that have the prestige and power. one of the unfortunate tendencies in business school curriculums is to allow shareholder value of ideology to prevail in most classes, and maybe there will be like one required class on business ethics or social responsibility, but create the notion that should be integrated to the business world, if we want our business world to thrive and we want to contribute to human welfare. >> right here, a question. >> i appreciate what you are saying. and the three solutions that i heard you offer -- is there anyone in public office that shares the same interest in what you are presenting that we can either contact or -- ? >> yes, peter bareez -- peter de vries of washington state and tom harkin in the senate. i have just come to our door t
to be a lame-duck member of congress? >> i don't feel lame at all. there is one item that it might be one of the mistakes i made in my life in public affairs. many years ago in southern california, when i was a member of the legislator, a fellow by the name of thomas was jailed for not being willing to give up his sources of information. i talked with my staff director in sacramento and said we must do something about this. it led to the first and only meeting i had with the board of the "los angeles times" which were discouraging me to go forward with a news man shield law. since then they have used in theiring aments in courts. today, i scratch my head especially when you look at the internet and say do we have to draw lines here? have we go too far? i personally think my position on a.c.a. is a good position and protecting the people's right to know is a high priority. >> what have you decided to do with all your papers and years in congress? >> that is an important question. i'm pleased to say that my alma mater at ucla is taking some interest. hopefully, some of that work will be of
in the office and they said, what ever you do, don't go in his office because he can be quite honoree. i could not wait to get in his office. the troopers day i went in and i saw he had all these posters of the metropolitan opera -- salome, la boeheme. i said, i am sort of an opera singer. >> where you hear? what are you doing here? anyhow, i worked for him for about six or seven months and then i got a call from another young arts program who said they got my name from pedro russell and they wanted to know i would come down and audition. i said, thank you, but i'm no longer your singing. days said they were just checking in because the name kept coming up. they call the third time. i was on the phone with a friend of mine and maybe a year had passed. i said, can you believe this? he said, you're crazy. every single would die to have an opera company called them. at that point, i had not sung in over one year and i had no idea what was going to come out. i told a woman on the phone, let me think about it and call you back. that night, i had a dream. i had a dream i had gone into the doctor's o
that you did nothing to the romney campaign emphasized that. >> i don't think they flushed him out enough. you have to be fully dimensional. it is not like any other office. people have to know who you are. they have to feel comfortable with who you are. whatever message you build, it has to be built around your biography and it has to be compelling. the romney campaign spent at least 90% of the money in the primary on negative ads and never spent time flushing it out, and developing a portrait of who romney was. after he won the rock -- after he won the nomination, we expected them to do that and create stronger sense among the american people as to who he was. they never did that. that left an opening. >> i want to talk more about the election campaign. let's stick with the chronology. you talked about the mid a tarrative -- the mets narrative. >> i think it is important. the iop and my basic approach to politics is rooted in the belief that it is more than just a game of tactics, strategies and thrust. it means something. what is fundamental and what ultimately made the difference for
that. i think we will see more efforts coming in the next four years. and i don't think exclusively in the for-profit sector. the last thing i would say is what i said earlier, which is that for people who do not complete, knowing that this is a factor that leads to default, that we do not make that the final sentence for everybody. ok, you tried it once. let's make it easier for people to transition out of default, to prevent them from getting into default in the first place. the best way to solve the problem is to help people and of -- end up succeeding. if you have better completion rates, you have your people in -- you will have fewer people in the problem in the first place. >> the key is getting the student who starts to the finish line. the focus on completion rates has a new ones to it. -- has a newuance to it. one of the easiest ways for college to have good completion rates is to deny admission to high risk students. we need to remove the obstacles that keep students from completing their education. i do not think community colleges are the solution. community colleges a
think portman could have changed the outcome? >> i don't know. there is a lot of reflection on that in romneyland. >> when you were talking about the adjustment that obama felt he had to undergo, and tell me what are the difficult things? >> what is different is the intense relentless scrutiny. remember, most candidates get to begin with very little press or no press in rooms of tender 12. he can -- of 10 or 12. he opened up right on broadway. and all of the reviewers were in the front row on the first day. as he was developing his chops as a presidential candidate, they were already evaluating. if you look at the first four months to five months of the primerica made it was very negative. he was underperforming. he was overrated. >> there was a lot of critique in the first stage. >> yes. they were bad. he said at the time, i am not a good candidate, but i will become one. i will learn to become a good candidate and he challenged himself. >> and all of your experience with candidates, what are the intangibles that candidates need to separate? >> i think authenticity. i thoug
male legislators because of the uniqueness or the new news or anything at all? " no. we>> you don't. i can see that on your faces. >> the role modeling for girls -- it was very hard on election day when no standing of the polls and families would come right up to me and introduced me to their daughters. i think we didn't have those role models when we were young and that feels different. but in terms of the responsibilities, i think it is very much the same. >> those series of questions run in washington, d.c. this question is a little bit more global. what does gender equality mean to you and how do you see that translated into tangible opportunities for women and men everywhere? you sort of hinted at that. [laughter] [applause] >> there is yet to be a really good woman's parade shoe. [laughter] anybody out there, that is a good product to think about. >> we are joking, but the reality is that we still have way too many women, not just in the united states, but around the world who do not have access to opportunities. if you look at women throughout the world, the number people living
and he said thompson, don't do that. thompson said sir, you should not be out here, this is dangerous. churchill said i'm only doing there because i know you love to, which was completely untrue. thompson would rather be down in the shelter. he went after the typists all the time and made life more give for them as he was dictated he dictated all of his member most and addresses, he didn't like shorthand because it is a middle man. why take shorthand and type when he can save time and you type. unfortunately he would have the gr gra old tunes going and and turn under the volume and he would speak looking out the window and the typist is over there and can't hear him and when she would finish he would come over to the typewriter and put his hand on the white piece of paper and say gimme. that was the signal that he was done. very curt. host: when did he walk in front of his typist with nothing on? nude. he didn't dictate but he would come out of his bathroom. the fact that he could move the taps with his toes and he would be splashing in his bath and the typist with be ready across the
, to keep the german and japanese finance going. i don't believe in pointing fingers at anyone. we are all part of this system that we have created over the last few decades. which met its nemesis because of its hubris. >> i would like to ask three questions. one is to summarise, briefly, what did happen in greece? why did we slide further down in the world? number two, could you please summarize an alternative approach? what could, for example, the greek prime minister have done instead of what they did it? and third, there is a hamiltonian economic system from 1789 that created a great america before america became a global power -- could that help greece? >> i will answer your questions starting at the beginning. what happened in greece? we created the eurozone. let me put it this way. in our country, because you come from greece, too, they have been monopolizing the headlines. there is something wrong with the world, if this can happen. imagine if there was a fiscal crisis in the great state of delaware that could bring the united states down. i think you would agree if i were to sugge
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